Drucker Centennial Award Recipients: John Bachmann, Bob Buford and Masatoshi Ito

All three were recognized at a gala dinner earlier this month in Claremont, where their accomplishments in support of education, business and civil society were highlighted.

The Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management and the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University have presented Drucker Centennial Leadership Awards to three outstanding individuals: John Bachmann, Bob Buford and Masatoshi Ito.

All three were recognized at a gala dinner earlier this month in Claremont, where their accomplishments in support of education, business and civil society were highlighted. The event was part of the Drucker Centennial, a global celebration marking the 100th birthday of the late Peter F. Drucker, widely known as the father of modern management; author of 39 books; and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Each award winner was given a bust of Peter Drucker, designed by Claremont artist Opoku Acheampong, with a personal inscription.

Bachmann serves as chairman of the Drucker-Ito School Board of Visitors and is also a member of the Drucker Institute Board of Advisors and a CGU Trustee. He is a senior partner at the St. Louis-based investment firm Edward Jones. During Bachmann’s 24-year stint as managing partner, Edward Jones grew from 200 offices in 28 states to more than 9,000 offices throughout the U.S., as well as in Canada and the United Kingdom. Bachmann has been involved with a broad range of professional and philanthropic undertakings, including serving as chairman of the Securities Industry Association, chairman of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, campaign chairman of the United Way of Greater St. Louis and chairman of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

Bachmann’s award, presented to him by CGU President Joe Hough, said: “For so effectively putting Peter’s principles into practice. . .For building a great company with great values. . .For two decades of service and stewardship at CGU and Drucker.”

Buford is the chairman of the Drucker Institute Board of Advisors. He is the author of four books, including the best seller Halftime: Changing Your Game Plan from Success to Significance; Game Plan: Winning Strategies for the Second Half of Your Life; Stuck in Halftime: Reinvesting Your One and Only Life; and Finishing Well. In 1984, he started Leadership Network, which identifies and provides resources for senior ministers and staff of large church congregations (1,000-plus in attendance). In January 1998, Buford launched what became Halftime, an organization that helps individuals find more meaning and significance in the second half of their lives. In 1999, Buford concluded a 35-year career in the communications business by selling Buford Television Inc., where he had been chairman.

Drucker Institute Executive Director Rick Wartzman presented Buford with his award. It read: “For releasing and directing energy. . .For building on islands of health and strength. . .For insisting that we think big or go home.”

Ito has been the Drucker-Ito School’s most significant supporter, with an initial $3 million gift to help build the School’s current home and a subsequent $20 million donation to assist the School with its strategic plans for the future. He is the founder and honorary chairman of the Ito-Yokado Group, the second-largest retailing organization in the world. Ito built the company from a small apparel store in Tokyo into a corporation with annual revenue of about $30 billion and a workforce of more than 125,000. The Ito-Yokado Group includes more than 10,000 7-Eleven stores in Japan and 5,800 in North America, along with 1,000 other stores—specialty shops, department stores, restaurants, supermarkets and superstores. Peter Drucker hailed Ito as “one of the world’s outstanding entrepreneurs and business builders.”

Ira Jackson, dean of the Drucker-Ito School, presented Ito with his award. It read:

“For your 30-year friendship with Peter Drucker. . .For building a global company in a Drucker-like way. . .For combining Peter’s thoughts with your actions and for enabling us to name our school for both a great thinker and an accomplished doer.”